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A 





I 











MANUFACTURERS OF 



GRAND, UPRIGHT AND SQUARE 





For over Fifty Years before the public, these instruments have, by their 

excellence, attained an unpurchased pre-eminence, which 

establishes them as UNEQUALLED in 

Tone, Touch, Workmanship and Durability. 

Every instrument fully warranted for Five Years. 



BALTIMORE, 
22 & 24 E. Baltimore St. 



WAREROOMS: 



New York, 
148 fifth ave., Near 20TH street. 



Washington, 

817 Pennsylvania Ave. 



E. W. TYLER, sole agent, 

178 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



THE KNilBE PIANOS, ^l\icl\ I did not Know before, nave 
beer\ cl\oser\ for rqy present" Concert tour ir\ tl\e Uryited States by 
n\y Impresario, ar\d accepted by n\e oi\ tl\e recommer\datior[ of rqy 
frier\d Bectistein, acquainted With, tl\eir n\erits. Had I Kr\oW:q tt|ese 
Piai\os as r\oW I do, I 'Would Y\ave cI\oser| tl\erq by rqyself, as tt\eir 
sour\d ar\d touch, are rqore sympathetic to n\y ears and nar\ds tl\ai\ 
all others of tl\e country. 



NEW YORK, 6th, April, 1889. 
To Ms. William Kr\abe ar\d Co. 



Dr. HUNS YON BULOW. 



(2) 



M. STEINERT&SONS, 



STEINERT HALL. 




^teititoay, ^eber, (Jarbman, 

fabler, anb Pease 

P-I-K-N-O-S. 



190 treivioNt street, corner boYLstoN, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



(3) 




ILDRICH 




THE ELEGANT NEW STORE, 

Washington and Kneeland Streets 



* 



Situated ir\ tt\e corr\er of our elegarjt r^ew store, bet^Weer) tt\e 
tw/o rqair\ er\trar\ces, is our Coqfectior^ery Departn\er]t, ^l\ict\ is or\e 
of tt\e largest arjd trie ljar\dson\est of aryy ir\ thjs city, Tlyis is fully 
stocked -Witl\ 

F^ESH COHFECTIOflE^V 

of all l\ir\ds of tt\e firmest Frer\cr\ Caqdies, ir\cludir)g NoUgatir^es, 
BaVariai\, St. Nicholas, Montevideo, Nar\or\, Operas, Chocolate 
Covered Cararqels, Opera Cararqels, Crystallized Frer\ct\ Fruits, etc. 
Also tl\e rqore corr]n\or\ ^ir\ds, 

ALL OF WHICH ARE STRICTLY AND ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

ar|d sold at rqoderate prices. 



^ 



The Finest Grocery Store in America. 

COBB, ALDRICH & CO., BOSTON. 

(4) 



Springer Brothers, 

Ladies' Jackets and Outside Garments 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 
500 Washington Street, gop. Bedford, BOSTOf*. 

N. B.— Students entitled to a discount. 



FOR FINE MILLINERY VISIT 

CEO. 7^. METHERN, 

21 and 23 TEMPLE PLACE. 

Strictly First-Class Goods at Popular Prices. 



ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES IN 

PINE MILLINERY 

Are shown on our counters as soon as in Paris, London or Berlin Market. 
Your patronage is respectfully solicited. 

GEO. M. WETHEEN. 




MARION D. EGBERT, 

Attorney-at-Law, Notary Public and Real Estate 

Broker, 

Walla Walla, Washington. 

All communications promptly answered. 

Walla Walla, besides being situated in the centre of the richest grain and fruit belt 
in America, is probably the prettiest and most handsomely situated city in the ISorth- 
west. It is a city of homes ; fine educational facilities, cultivated society, ideal climate. 
Come and see us, or write me. 



JMMOp, KpWLIOF I 



G. A. Hammond, 

Putnam, Conn. 



C. C. KNOWLTON, 
New York City. 



Louis Hauchhaus, 

New York Citv. 







'onu/aotuMM, 



miiiiiiHiimiimiiiiimmiiimmimiiimiiimiiiimiiiin niiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



Putnam, Connecticut. 



Machine Silks, 

Sewing Silks, 

Button-Hole Twists, 
And Tailors' Silk Braids. 



SALESROOMS : 

Main Office, ?24 Broadway, New York. 

83 and 85 Summer St., BOSTON; Cumner, Jones & Co. 
238 and 240 Fifth Ave., CHICAGO; S. M. CONGER. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



1® 



Importers, Jobbers, Retailers 



AND 



Manufacturers' Agents. 



Carpeting? 




• • • Oil (Jloflj, • ■ • 

• Oriental tyijjft 
■ • Gtfpetys and UptolgtojJ. • • 

558 and 560 Washington Street, 

30 to J4 Harrison Avenue Extension. 

IOSTO.N. 
113 Worth Street, New York. 



WHITNEY'S 



INEN STORE. 



LIBERAL DISCOUNT ON WEDDING OUTFITS. 



^v^'W^M^T'M 











^rfe&W^i^l 









WE Stanqp Free all goods purchased of Us; also, 
M)e prepay Mail aqd Express Charges to 
cities and to^ns 25 rr\iles fronq Bostori. 



TEMPLE PLHCE, BOSTON. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/allerlei1891unse 




EDWARD LASELL, 

ProfBssar of Chemistry, Williams College, 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 





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AND THE 



LA5ELL WORLD 




Jap^eant, 



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onager. 



l/j)l\\{h B.jJAI^VEY, 



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hief. 



Lucy Ji Roberts, 
JVan^. Pea body, 

jSusanC Richards, 
Helen ^.Th^eshe^ 

Assislanf Eclifors. 




(preface. 




HEN ''Annual" was first whispered in our midst 
little did we realize the vast amount of labor and 
patience which is necessary to the publication of 
such a work. We have expended a large amount 
of both, especiall} 7 the latter, and now throw our efforts on 
the unsympathizing world in the shape of the first volume of 
the Allerlei, hoping it will be leniently received. We 
realize that there must be no secrets between our readers and 
ourselves, so we publish the trials and tribulations of our 
friends in misery, and hope in this way to remind gently our 
associates of their faults, and help them to overcome these 
slight obstacles to a brilliant career after their school-days 
are over(?). If at first you do not understand the meaning 
of any remark, do not be discouraged and give up, but 
persevere, for there is meat there if ever you reach it, 
sometimes bitter, sometimes sweet. Jokes born out of 
necessity may fall heavily ; attempts at wit may often be at 
a discount. We do not expect one poor brain to fathom 
all the mysteries ; that would be too much. It is beyond 
human capability. 

We here take the opportunity to thank our beloved Pro- 
fessor for the interest he has manifested, and the assistance 

(16) 



he has rendered us in the publication of Lasell's first An- 
nual ; the teachers, for their hearty cooperation and support ; 
the school, for its support and encouragement. Without 
them and their kindest assistance the public would never 
have received these productions from our pens. Who 
would have furnished us the material to work upon if we 
had had no fellow-students? To the advertisers who have 
so kindly helped to decorate our pages and to whose timely 
assistance we owe so much, we offer greetings and thanks, 
and hope they may think the background for their wares 
fitting. To the next class upon whom will devolve the 
duty of publishing the Alt.erlei, we wish much joy and 
success. Begin earlv in the year, work night and day, but 
above all keep a stiff upper lip and put it through, hoping 
for some success to crown your efforts in the end. 

We would imagine if we could what we would have 
done had not our artists been born, and to the manner. 
They, we feel sure, have sharpened many of our little jokes, 
and furnished pith td the whole. To them, most of all, we 
owe allegiance evermore. 

We only desire to open a road for hosts of other editors 
to travel, and we would humbly petition that you " no 
longer seek our merits to disclose or draw our frailties from 
their dread abode. There they alike in trembling hope re- 
pose, etc., etc." We then take you to the entrance of this 
first venture, and advise, "AH hope abandon, ye who 
enter here." 



DyT) 



(17) 



QJSoaro of &vwtm + 

e. e. gp^on, 

G. i^ £afep, 
E. 02. Fov/Ig, 
C- W. Gay, 

£. J), pae^apd, 

P. §. $im[®5°r2, 
£. P. epoptep, 

/A. (§. ¥ov/0p. 



Vfrn illlSir r^« 



^ __ ___._ g)^ 



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CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M.A., 

PRINCIPAL. 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND HISTORY. 

CATHARINE J. CHAMBERLAYNE, 

FRENCH. 

URSULA CUSHMAN, 

LOGIC, PSYCHOLOGY, AND HISTORY OF ART. 

WILLIAM J. ROLFE, M.A., 

SHAKESPEARE. 

LILLIE M. PACKARD, Ph.B., 

MATHEMATICS. 

LIZZIE SHINN, B.A., 

LATIN AND GREEK. 

ADELE ROTH, 

FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

GABRIELLE NOURY-ABBOT, 

FRENCH. 

HERBERT LOWELL RICH, Ph.B., 

NATURAL SCIENCES. 

MARY B. CUTLER, B.L., 

ENGLISH. 

ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 

BOOK-KEEl'ING AND PENMANSHIP. 

ANNIE P. CALL, 

READING AND NERVE TRAINING. 
(19) 



SARAH S. SPYKER, 

READING. 

JENNIE S. FARWELL, 

DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, 

PIANO, HARMONY, AND THEORY OF MUSIC. 

J. WALTER DAVIS, 

VOICE CULTURE AND CHORUS SINGING. 

EDWIN A. SABIN, 

VIOLIN. 

MAUDE C. SNYDER, 

GUITAR AND MANDOLIN. 

FLORENCE C. SHERWOOD, 

HARP AND AUTOHARP. 

KATE E. PLUMMER, 

ORGAN. 

MARTHA E. RANSOM, 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

LIZZIE A. CHENEY, 

ASSISTANT IN GYMNASTICS. 

MARTHA G. CHAMPLIN, M.D., 

RESIDENT PHYSICIAN. 

Capt. WILLIAM L. FOX, 

MILITARY DRILL. 

MARY S. OAKES, 

COOKING. 

ROSE E. HARKINS, . 

DRESS-CUTTING. 

JULIA FOWLE, 

MILLINERY. 

REBECCA G. WINDSHIP, 

ART NEEDLE-WORK. 

G. G. GREENWOOD, 

PHONOGRAPHY AND TYPE-WRITING. 



(20) 



QMurntafe* 




oO^Oo 

F the many beautiful suburban towns of America, the traveller 
could scarcely find a more lovely spot than is the village of 
Auburndale. The first thing to meet the eye of the stranger, 
on alighting from the cars, is the long, low station, built of 
brown stone, to which the luxuriant and graceful vines cling so lovingly. 
The broad and well-kept streets, the handsome residences, the neat 
flower-gardens and lawns, — free from the needless protection of fences, 
— present to the new arrival a charming picture. As he walks along 
the avenues, shaded by tall old trees, there gradually comes to him a 
feeling that there is much more in the place than can be taken in by a 
superficial glance. 

On becoming better acquainted with the place, it is discovered that 
all its charms are not of recent date ; that Auburndale has a history, if 
not a mystery. If the stranger be so favored of fortune as to gain 
admittance to its social circles, he will find the citizens to be of 
superior intellect and refinement. The inhabitants of Auburndale are 
noted for their virtues, their broad education, and their wealth. This 
has been the home of celebrated artists and of renowned writers. 
Here fervent ministers of the gospel find a congenial place in which to 
spend the quiet evening of life after its more active labors. On account 
of the large number of retired ministers, and of missionaries returned 
from successful work in foreign fields, the tranquil place has received 
the sobriquet of " Saints 1 Rest. 1 ' 

When the Puritan Fathers, weary of oppression, sought freedom 01 
thought and conscience in the forests of America, they could find no 
more suitable place in which to pitch their tents than in the neighbor- 
hood of Boston. No sooner had they built their rude huts and gained 
a start in the new life, than they wished to have their sons educated ; 
and this, not primarily for their own good alone, but that they might 

(21) 



better teach the Indians, who begged for instruction. Strange as it 
may now seem, Harvard College was founded in order to train young 
men to become home missionaries. 

From the love that the founders of this school bore to their old Alma 
Mater of England, they changed the name of its location from Newtown 
to Cambridge. As the years went by, and the population increased 
under the favor of God and the pursuits of integrity and of honest labor, 
the town spread south of the river Charles. While the College portion 
assumed the name Cambridge, the part across the river still retained 
the old name of Newtown, finally Newton. This was in 1638. My 
long digression from my subject may be pardoned when it is known 
that Auburndale is one of the ten villages which constitute the city of 
Newton, so that the early history of Newton is that of Auburndale. 

All the first settlers of this district were so struck with its similarity 
to the renowned " Sweet Auburn, loveliest village of the plain," that 
for many years it was called " Sweet Auburn.'' 1 On account of its 
admirable situation among the encircling hills which form the Upper 
Cheesecake Glen, it was finally christened the appropriate name it now 
bears. The territory now covered by Auburndale was, in the seven- 
teenth century, the homestead of William Robinson. He left the 
property to his sons, one of whom built the Bourne House, which 
afterwards became Whittemore's Tavern. This interesting old house 
was situated on Woodland avenue, on which is now the no less cele- 
brated, but somewhat more modern, building of Lasell Seminary. At 
the time of the Concord fight, in 1775, the inn was a half-century 
old — as it was used as a tavern as early as 1724. No doubt the 
patriotic pioneers, on the day which witnessed the first bloodshed of 
the War of Independence, gathered at this ancient hostelry to recount 
and receive news of the battle — the sound of whose guns could dis- 
tinctly be heard. Here the interested rustics discussed the day's 
events, and perhaps some heroes of the victory " fought the battle 
o'er again, 11 and "laid plans that have since become history. 1 ' 

One of the principal streets of Auburndale, called Auburn, was laid 
out in 1729, as "a way from the fording place in the Charles River. 11 
This was while George II. was reigning in England. A delightful 
walk for a bright spring morning would be to the site of the wigwam 
of Waban, the chief of the Nonantum Indians. During the hunting 
seasons he delighted to camp on the banks of the Ouinobequin — as 
the Charles river was called in the musical Indian language. In this 
sequestered spot Waban's braves could shoot deer and bears, as well 
as smaller game, or could float in their birch canoes while fishing 
among the shady inlets of the Quinobequin, 

" On whose banks the Indian maiden wept, 
As in his bark canoe her lover from her swept. 
Here she prepared their simple meal of maize." 

(22) 



Before the wigwam of this chief, under the shade of a large tree, the 
" feather-cintured 11 savages listened for hours to the message of God 
delivered by the " Apostle to the Indians. 1 ' Thus the first sermon to 
the Indians in their native tongue was preached by the Rev. John 
Eliot, Oct. 28, 1646. 

Echo Bridge, at the Upper Falls, is a delightful and romantic place 
to explore. Nothing can rival the beauty of the whole place when 
tinged with the silver light of the moon. For six miles along the river, 
both banks are crowded, in the season for them, with pure-white water- 
lilies. Charmed with the superior loveliness of the scenery, Ralph 
Waldo Emerson, after his return from Europe, in 1833, spent many 
happy years in an old farm-house near here. The bridge is part of 
that wonderful aqueduct, sixteen miles in length, which supplies Bos- 
ton with drinking-water. Under one end of the bridge there is a small 
platform, on which visitors may stand and send their voices across the 
water. On a still night the echoes may be counted as often as eighteen 
times, and a pistol-shot has twenty-five reverberations. There is an 
interesting old legend of a pair of Indian lovers hovering around the 
spot. Echo, the beautiful daughter of a chief, fell in love with a young 
brave of lower rank. Of course there was much opposition to the un- 
equal union on the part of the irate father. So, like lovers in higher 
life, they planned an elopement; but their plot was discovered, and the 
faithful nut-brown maid gave up her life in the vain attempt to join her 
lover. 

Across the Charles river from Auburndale, one may see the supposed 
site of the old Norwegian settlements. There are old walls, dams, 
pavements, and canals, which are undoubtedly many centuries old. It 
is thought by those who have studied the matter thoroughly, that this 
region was first discovered by Bjorni Herjulfson as early as 985 A.D. 
That it was colonized in 1000, by Thorfinn Karlsfene, 1007. On the 
ruins of an old fort, supposed to have been built by the Norseman in 
1000, an enterprising gentleman of Cambridge has built a rough stone 
tower. The Indians called the place Norumbega. This picturesque 
tower is an exceedingly interesting place to visit, and the view from its 
summit presents one more of the many charming pictures to be seen in 
and near Auburndale. 




(23) 




93 




>/^l 
'<**.&& 




yrpsiman (jKass. 




^x>X*4c 



HAS been requested in a gentlemanly manner by 
the Juniors to insert her history in their Annual. 
As her existence on this mundane sphere began 
only six months ago, she is a mere infant, and is but now 
acquiring the arts of talking and walking; her history is as 
yet one great interrogation -point. 

'93 is made up of young women of all sorts and condi- 
tions. Some of her members are very, very good, while 
the remainder are so horrid that their conduct neutralizes 
that of the first. She has representatives in the temper- 
ance, missionary, and anti-slang societies, and is always 
ready to " rescue the perishing." 

One of her number has expressed her determination to be 
a physician, and, after getting a sheepskin here, she will 
drag her weary frame to some other portion of the globe to 
continue her studies for three years longer. At the end of 
that time, when her desire is accomplished, and she has an 
M.D. attached to her name, she will sit down like " Pa- 
tience on a monument " to wait for the time when the 
monument shall be on the patients. 

Another advocates dress-reform, and in the dim sweet 



(37) 



future we see her a second Mrs. Jenness-Miller, addressing 
a vast audience, while coming Lasell girls occupy seats in 
the bald-headed row. 

A third, in destitute circumstances, is desirous of earning 
a livelihood by doing " fancy darning with lightning rapid- 
ity and at lowest prices." We trust that her efforts may be 
rewarded, and that her income will be sufficient to allow 
her to pay her Senior expenses, and still have enough re- 
maining for her fare " over the hills to the poor-house." 

'93 boasts a would-be musician. "From morn to noon, 
from noon to dewy eve," the lives of the room-mate and 
neighbors of this young musician are made miserable by the 
sounds of "Galilee" played on a banjo very much out of 
tune, by a person decidedly a novice. 

Her other members have not as yet declared what course 
they will pursue ; but we all know that they will be up, 'way 
up, terribly up, in whatever career they select. 

'93 has discovered the truth of the saying, " Be good and 
you will be happy, but you won't have any fun," and conducts 
herself accordingly. The most of her time is spent in listen- 
ing to the choice bits read in chapel, in writing dreadful 
German flubby-dubs in small copy-books, and in attending 
Mrs. Faxon's weekly receptions. Besides these things there 
are various other duties distributed where they will do the 
most good, and altogether her former happy life is made 
miserable and " a weariness to the flesh." 

She is striving to learn as rapidly as possible. Those of 
her number who are taking dress-cutting can now make 
a Mother-Hubbard after a fashion, and that fashion entirely 
her own ; and her members in cooking have reached that 
degree of perfection where they can concoct dishes which any 
one might fall down and worship without fear of punishment, 
for they resemble nothing " in the heaven above, or the earth 
beneath, or the waters under the earth." 



(28) 



Under her present able instructor she will, at the end of her 
four-years' captivity, be able to draw quite a respectable map 
of Palestine, which any one with a vivid imagination would 
easily recognize. 

But before that time arrives '93 will have to pass through 
several trying ordeals, one of which will be the production of 
the " Annual" in her Junior year. But with the characteristic 
energy of her members, she will rise to the emergency as one 
girl, and promptly, swiftly, beautifully, and skilfully perform 
all duties laid upon her. 

'SB- 






W 



(39) 



FRESHMAK CLASS. 



-oOSSKfto 



oi) te/ievr^dEv 6X)C dp^dtv. 



CLASS COLORS 



GOLD AND BLOOD RED. 



FLORA M. GARDNER, President. 



Names. 



Arnold, Jennie M. . 
Baldwin, Maud M. . 
Coe, Alice M. 
Couch, Eva L. 
Davis, Nelle G. . . 
Dodds, Helen M. . 
Gardner, Flora M. . 
Lam me, Fannie . 
Lamson, Myrna . 
Reynolds, Gertrude P. 
Richards, Nellie M. 
Roper, Jessie A. . . 
Russell, Helen . 
Shellabarger, Grace 
Slavins, Dadie C. 
Swift, Frances G. 
Westcott, Laura . 




66 

39 
Town 

36 

3i 

23 
31 

25 

59 
29 

6 

63 
14 
61 
1 r 
20 

43 



Residences. 



Peabody. 
Haiku, H. Is. 
Auburndale. 
Round Pond, Me. 
Chicago, 111. 
North Hero, Vt. 
Chicago, 111. 
Bozeman, Mont. 
Chicago, 111. 
East Haddam, Conn. 
Newton. 
Alton, 111. 
Jefferson, I. 
Decatur, 111. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Falmouth. 
Burlington, N.J. 



(30) 




02 




jMomorp (Jlass. 



^^^^HERE was no Annual at Lasell until the Class of 

I ) \)2 came. Our first natural timidity, on entering 

seminary lite, soon wore away, for we found that 

our giant intellects were more than a match for those who 

had been here for years (five-year specials). 

We owe our organization as a class fo the Seniors. We 
humbly bow to them and thank them for their assistance 
(please present bill). The Seniors! who tower above us 
like balloons (gas in the head, you see). Although we fully 
appreciate their kindness, yet for their sakes we will refrain 
from stating the particulars. 

Our achievements in class-work are mighty and wonderful. 
To give a few examples of our greatness : In Trigonometry 
we have found tangents and cosines by the same method, thus 
forming new rules, which, by comparison with our text, we 
have found to be much easier to learn. In our study of Nat- 
ural Philosophy, although we do not see the " isness " and 
" soness " of a law lately discovered by a brilliant member, — 
" an atmosphere composed entirely of oxygen would facilitate 

(3.3) 



brain-work," — still we cannot help wishing that it were true, 
when we must deal with such an indefinitely large number of 
small thin slices of uniform material parallelograms, whose 
thickness is " indefinitely small," and " vacuums of water " (a 
lapsus linguce, as it is known). The determination of the 
specific gravity of a bit of lead proved too much for the fairy 
fingers of the girls, one after another returning to her seat, 
saying, with an appealing glance at the young professor, "The 
very weight I needed most slipped into the water-jar and I 
can't get it out." The jar was emptied, the elusive weight 
recovered, and another attempt made ; but the very weight 
she wanted succeeded again and again in slipping into the 
water, while the provoking hydrometer danced up and clown 
in the jar like the diabolical Cartesian diver. 

Owing to the many explanations of our ever-patient profes- 
sor, we fully understand why liquids should attain the same 
level in communicating vessels ; but great was our consterna- 
tion when asked what was the law of gases in communicating 
vessels. We humbly confess our ignorance, and it is still one 
of the mysteries of the class-room. In our fifty or sixty other 
studies we are equally bright. 

Our brightness is not confined to the class-room alone, for 
in our daily conversation we discuss such deeply interesting 
and instructive topics as the latest brand of chewing-gum ; the 
length of time necessary to boil a hot egg ; the common, 
every-day cotton that grows on sheeps' backs. 

That we are popular, is shown by the great number of 
organizations which are represented in our class. Not a club 
or society can be mentioned to which some of our members 
do not belong. 

(34) 



Great are the feats that we perform in athletics, and respon- 
sible are the positions which we hold in the Battalion (corpo- 
rals, second lieutenants, etc.). 

Although we come from just beyond the four points of the 
compass, and have a Wolfe in our midst, its fierce growls are 
quieted by the sweet notes of the Lutes. 

When our school-days are o'er we shall triumphantly march 
forth, always "guide right," and never dishonor our banner, 
whose motto, " Droit et Loyal." is the sentiment of each one 
of us. 






(35) 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



-00>S^CK>- 



Droit et Loyal. 



CLASS COLORS 



APPLE GREEN AND WHITE. 



ANNA STALEY. President. 



Names. 



Burrill, Sadie W. . 
Cole, Alice . 
Davis, Lizzie W. . 
Hammond, Bertha E. 
Lowe, Edna M. . . 
Lutes, Maude K. . 
Morrison, Olive L. 
Sampson, Lucy B. 
Simpson, Ida R. . 
Staley, Anna . 
Wolfe, Julia T. . 



Rooms. 


Residences. 


39 


Ellsworth, Me. 


49 


Chester, 111. 


37 


Englewood, 111. 


3° 


Putnam, Conn. 


l 9 


Norristown, Pa. 


40 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


42 


Bryan, O. 


64 


Denver, Col. 


22 


Pensacola, Fla. 


27 


Ottawa, Kan. 


23 


St. Louis, Mo. 



(36) 




9 






junior (Jtoss. 



-o-o^c 



T ("j aT WAS perhaps the most remarkable year in the 
^^ A world's history, for in it '91 was born. From 

the first she has been beloved both by teachers and scholars, 
and although she has now reached years of maturity, 
she still retains much of the innocence of her freshman 
days. So apparent is this, that her members are easily 
distinguished by the prevailing air of childlike simplicity 
in which they are enveloped. Indeed, not long ago a 
distinguished phrenologist, in the course of his lecture, 
chanced to glance at a member of '91, and so struck was 
he by her appearance that he paused in the middle of his 
discourse to observe, '< You are as innocent as a lamb." 

Despite this innocency, '91 does not lack spirit. If any 
one doubts this, let him attend a class meeting when any 
question of importance is about to be discussed. The with- 
ering sarcasm which is poured from the lips of the lambs 
is truly astonishing. 

Generosity is also one of her marked traits. What other 
class has afforded so much amusement to the community at 

(39) 



large as "the Junior Class of '90" furnished in giving her 
charming evening with "American Authors"? Did she not 
interpret the writings of our countrymen with truly artistic 
skill ? Did she not perpetrate jokes so obtuse that many of 
those in the audience were furnished with material for care- 
ful thought during the next three months in the vain 
attempt to discover the point? 

It is rumored that '91 is getting along swimmingly, but 
not, as some of the under classmen suppose, supported by 
cork. 

Surely no member has been found guilty of confiscating 
the Yale " Record," the Harvard " Lampoon," and other 
periodicals from the exchange table, or causing the librarian 
the painful (?) necessity of searching the room during 
occupant's absence for u Youth's Companion," missing from 
the left-hand pigeon-hole. 

No one could suspect such things of this class when they 
realize that it has introduced the first honorary member into 
the school, as well as presenting the first volume of the 
Allerlei. See! "What are the facts?" 

'91 is exceedingly popular with the opposite sex. To be 
sure, gentlemen in this part of the world are like angels' 
visits, few and far between, but the few who do appear 
immediately succumb to her charms. In fact, out of a class 
of fourteen, two are already engaged (this is painfully evi- 
dent) , and one has hopes. She expects that the mail may 
bring her a proposal at any hour of the day or night, but 
as yet 'tis a sad repetition of " the letter that never came," 
and day by day she grows more wan and pale. 

'91 has ever been the especial pet and pride of our pro- 

(40) 



fessor ot vocal music. Throughout the long and weary 
months he has patiently toiled with her voices, and cheered 
her drooping spirits by "Just once more, young ladies, and 
then you may go." At first this sentence did its work, but 
after three years' experience, '91 has learned that " Just 
once more " is a delusion and a snare, and that it means 
usually about twenty times more. But enough of the past. 
Let us look forward, not backward. With all her faults, 
we love her still. 

v. 




(40 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



-o-o^gsfoo- 



Honorary Member. 




:? To thine own self be true" 



CLASS COLORS 



OLD ROSE AND MOSS GREEN. 



LUCY E. SARGEANT, President. 



Names. 



Baker, Susan S 

Benton, Jessie A 

Colburn, Ida E. . 

Evans, Maud M. 

Harvey, Sara B 

Hubbard, Julia P 

Johnson, Nellie 

Peabody, Nan S 

Richards, Susan C. ..... . 

Roberts, Lucy H . 

Sargeant, Lucy E 

Snyder, Maude C 

Thresher, Helen H 

Winsor, Sarah M 

Woodbury, Nettie F 

(42) 



Rooms. 


Residences. 


77 


Maryville, Tenn. 


Hotel. 


Auburndale. 


62 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


33 


Kansas City, Mo. 


25 


Chicago, 111. 


53 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


Town. 


Walla Walla, Wash. 


28 


Cincinnati, 0. 


47 


Weymouth. 


61 


Decatur, 111. 


6 


E. Saugus. 


30 


Freeport, 111. 


47 


Monson. 


Town. 


Auburndale. 


38 


Beverly. 




00 



£2& 



junior 0ess. 



>J=©^c 



/^"^^ OMETHING in regard to the Senior Class must 
^^^^\ be written in seven hundred and fifty words. This 
•^*— " number is somewhat inadequate to such a task ; 
however, one can but do his best. 

What can be said of the Senior Class in seven hundred 
and fifty words? It has had no thrilling experiences; its 
horizon has not been illuminated by phenomenal brilliancy. 
In fact, unlike all the other classes, '90's career has been 
commonplace and ordinary. She was born in obscurity, the 
child of rich but honest parents, nourished within the pro- 
tecting walls of Lasell, until at length the time has come 
when Alma Mater will send her forth to face, we trust, an 
appreciative public. 

It may be that '90 has been somewhat conservative ; it 
has never been her custom to embrace new ideas without 
giving them due consideration, and it has been said of her 
that she was far behind her sister classes. We contend, 
however, that this criticism is most unkind, for where can 
such another example of perfect passivity be found? You 
who practise concentration will be able to understand '90's 
superiority when you are told that '90 has had no squabbles, 
no disorderly class meetings ; but, with her eye fixed firmly 
upon the goal before her, has been content to float gently 

down life's troubled stream. She has been true to herself 

(45) 



and to her conscience ; she has carried out the text, "Suffi- 
cient unto the day is the evil thereof," even through the 
trying ordeals of examinations, lectures, and Haven's Psy- 
chology. She has never sought to push herself forward ; but, 
when the opportunity has been offered, it has been found 
that she could argue questions which the most profound 
scholars had never dared to touch, with an "ease, grace, and 
precision " and a tenacity of purpose worthy of a better 
cause. (Three hundred words now written.) In all good 
undertakings, '90 has taken a firm and decided stand. Has 
she not graced the scenes of many an auction with her 
presence, and has not the heart of the weary auctioneer been 
gladdened, times without number, by the prompt and noble 
manner in which she has come to his rescue when the bid- 
ding has degenerated into the " sere and yellow leaf"? 
Has she not refrained from talking in the library, even when 
her spirit was torn with conflicting emotions, aroused by 
Carpenter on Memory and McCosh on the Will? Has she 
not cast the eye of contempt and scorn upon those members 
of '91 who have insisted upon disturbing the quiet of the 
reading-room by discussing "Free Trade and Protection" 
in hoarse whispers, leading one to suppose that they really 
had no idea of protection, at least as regards the rights of 
others? Has she not learned hymn after hymn at the re- 
quest of "the powers that be," in order that the younger 
girls might be inspired to go and do likewise? And has 
she not persistently upheld the drill, even in the face ot 
much adverse criticism ? To all these questions a universal 
affirmation is given. (Four hundred and ninety words 
written.) 

'90's name may not go down to posterity on account ot 
her excellences ; but then her efforts have not been put forth 
for the sake of posterity. She has reasoned, in the language 
of a well-known humorist, " Why should I do anything for 
the sake of posterity? What has posterity ever done for 
me?" But, even if her excellences are not astonishingly 
abundant, at least her calm and peaceful attitude toward all 

(46) 



the vicissitudes of boarding-school life, and the dignified 
manner in which she has endeavored to make the best of 
everything, will render her dear to the memories of all who 
know her, and perhaps in days to come the story of her life 
shall serve to inspire more freshmen to scale the heights of 
knowledge. 

'90 has some characteristics which render her a peculiar 
class. For example, she thinks there may yet remain some- 
thing for her to learn. This state of mind, it must be ad- 
mitted, is abnormal, and many, it is understood, are awaiting 
the result of this new departure on the part of a graduating 
class. On the whole, '90 has many eccentricities. Her 
future is enveloped in obscurity as dark and impenetrable as 
that which veils her origin. She is small in size, and how 
she may stand the rude buffets of an unsympathizing world 
is a question time alone can solve. However, " Quality, 
not quantity," has ever been her watchword, and, upheld 
by an unfaltering trust in her own resources, she cannot 

fail. 

'90. 




(47) 



T T 




SEHIOR CLASS. 



a^foo- 



Per am-pliora ad altiora. 



CLASS COLORS 



YELLOW AND WHITE. 



MARY L. SUTTON, President. 



Names. 


Rooms. 


Residences. 


Commins, Addie H 

Pearce, Etha E 


6 4 

8 

49 
29 


Akron, O. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Painesville, O. 
Rome, N.Y. 



00 



(4S) 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Names. 



Ames, Lucy T. 
Anderson, Julia W. . 
Atkinson, Nancy . 
Ball, Jessie M. . . . 

Bond, Eva R 

Bragdon, K. Belle . 
Brown, Anne A. . 
Burr, Annie M. . 
Carll, Maude E. . 
Chapin, Anne H. . . 
Clarkson, Carolyn 
Colburn, Madeline . 
Collins, Pauline . 
Davis, Amelia S. . . 
Edgerton, Janie F. . 
Englehart, L. Mabel 
Englehart, Stella G. 
Fisher, Mary K. . . . 
Gibson, Elva L. . 
Goodell, Alice M. . . 
Hall, Jessie A. 
Hamilton, Katherine E. 
Hanmer, Mary A. 
Hawes, Florence D. 
Hood, Mary . . . , 
Hubbard, Alma R. . 
Hubbard, Margaret . 
Johnson, Carrie B. . 
Johnson, Ellen R. 
Lathrop, Mary F. . , 
Littlefield, Maude W. 
Lord, Mabel D. . . . 
Loring, Helen M. . 
Lothrop, Bessie P. . 
Medsker, Helen B. . 
Merrill, Mary L. . . 



Rooms. 


Residences. 


70 


Machias, Me. 


7 


Taylorville, 111. 


20 


Fort Smith, Ark. 


59 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


60 


Toledo, O. 


Town . 


Auburndale. 


35 


Hartford, Conn. 


27 


Middletown, Conn. 


23 


Northport, L.I. 


45 


Holyoke. 


63 


Topeka, Kan. 


62 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


26 


Oakland, Cal. 


38 


Fall River. 


18 


Charleston, S.C. 


5 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


5 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


40 


Fall River. 


9 


Clarks, Neb. 


14 


Worcester. 


13 


Kansas City, Mo. 


57 


Shreveport, La. 


53 


Hartford, Conn. 


48 


Chicago, 111. 


36 


Knoxville, Tenn. 


S3 


Wheeling, W.Va. 


54 


Sioux Falls, S. Da. 


7 


Yonkers, N.Y. 


Town. 


Natick. 


70 


Walden. 


67 


Rondout, N.Y. 


45 


Orange, N.Y. 




Newton Centre. 


44 


Denver, Col. 


32 


Kansas City, Mo. 


4i 


Exeter, N.H. 



(49) 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. — Continued. 



Names. 



Millikin, Desdemona . 
Morse, Harriett C. . 
Morse, Elizabeth G. 
Ninde, Leila M. . . . 
Northam, Arline . 
Ostrander, Sarah B. 
Paine, Annita L. 
Pfau, Augusta L. 
Prickett, Effie M. . , 
Putney, Minnie E. . 

Rice, May L 

Rowe, Emily D. . 
Rowe, Susanne L. 
Sage, Blanche B. . 
Sawyer, L. Mabel 
Shellabarger, Marie . 
Shepherd, Rebecca C. . 
Sidway, Edith . . . 
Slavens, Martha S. . 
Smith, NellaW. . . . 
Soule, Lois M. . . . 
Sternberg, H. May . 
Stevens, Mabel H. . 
Stowe, M. Virginia . . 
Stowe, Willie A. . . . 
Tichenor, E. Josephine 
Towle, May E. . . . 
Warren, Millie C. 
Watson, Katharine C. . 
White, Charlotte A. 
Whitney, Laura G. . 
Whitney, Maude E. . . 
Wilder, Daisy A. . . 
Williams, Elizabeth E. 
Witherbee, Mary P. 
Woodbury, Gertrude F. 
Woodbury, Minnie S. . 



Rooms. 



61 



24 

52 

5i 

9 
29 

26 



57 
65 
65 
54 
Town. 
61 



35 
11 

44 
10 
18 

13 
15 

15 

60 

22 

58 

4i 

54 

5 

5 

8 

10 

74 
58 



Residences. 



Decatur, 111. 
Newtonville. 
Newtonville. 
Oskaloosa, La. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Troy, N.Y. 
Cambridge. 
Hamilton, O. 
Hazardville, Conn. 
Manchester, N.H. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Sioux Falls, Da. 
Auburndale. 
Decatur, 111. 
Auburndale. 
Buffalo, N.Y. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Ottawa, Kan. 
New Bedford. 
Reading, Pa. 
Lowell. 

Galveston, Texas. 
Galveston, Texas. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Evanston, 111. 
New Boston, N.H. 
Toledo, O. 
Glens Falls, N.Y. 
Millbury. 
Millbury. 
New York, N.Y. 
Muncie, Ind. 
Laurel, Del. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Burlington, Vt. 



(So) 




Dve'kttiJVdtsi/. 




H!T 



3D Societg. 



FOUNDED 1877. 



President. 
MINNIE H. SHERWOOD. 

Vice-President. 
LAURA G. WHITNEY. 



Secretary. 
KATHARINE C. WATSON. 



Treasurer. 
DESDEMONA MILLIKEN 



Critic. 
NETTIE F. WOODBURY. 



Maude M. Baldwin. 
Amelia L. Davis. 
Jean F. Edgerton. 
Mary K. Fisher. 
Katharine E. Hamilton. 
Grace Shellabarger. 
Maud C. Snyder. 
Lois M. Soule. 
Maude W. Littlefield. 
Gertrude P. Reynolds. 
Susie C. Richards. 
Mabel H. Stevens. 
Mary L. Sutton. 



Fannie Lamme. 
Jessie A. Roper. 
Emily D. Rowe. 
Susanne L. Rowe. 
Marie Shellabarger. 
Maude K. Lutes. 
Mary L. Merrill. 
Nan S. Peabody. 
Gussie L. Pfau. 
May E. Towle. 
Maude Whitney. 
Elizabeth E. Williams. 
Gertrude F. Woodbury. 




(SO 




[)rrl,-t<. Vint 'a 




Las^llia <?lub. 



3>»<t 



President. 
NELLA W. SMITH. 

Vice-President. 

ANNIE H. CHAPIN. 



Secretary. 
ANNIE M. BURR. 



Treasurer. 
MYRNA LAM SON. 



Critic. 
ANNITA L. PAINE. 



Nancy Atkinson. 
Jessie M. Ball. 
Eva R. Bond. 
Anne A. Brown. 
Mary A. Hanmer 
Sara B. Harvey. 
Julia P. Hubbard. 
Margaret Hubbard. 
Mary L. Rice. 
Edith Sid way. 
Martha S. Slavens. 
E. Josephine Tichenor. 



Sadie W. Burrill. 
Carolyn Clarkson. 
Ida E. Colburn. 
Flora M. Gardner. 
Mabel D. Lord. 
Edna M. Lowe. 
Arline Northam. 
Etha E. Pearce. 
Lucy B. Sampson. 
Anna Staley. 
Charlotte White. 
Daisy Wilder. 



%* 



(53^ 



Christian Associations. 



TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 

LUCY H. ROBERTS President. 

ANNA STALEY Vice-President. 

JULIA T. WOLFE Secretary. 

MAUDE E. WHITNEY Treasurer. 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

LUCY E. SARGEANT President. 

LILLIE M. PACKARD Vice-President. 

NELLIE M. RICHARDS Secretary. 

GUSSIE L. PFAU Treasurer. 

SADIE W. BURRILL, n 

ADD IE H. COM M INS, > Executive Co?nmittee. 

LAURA HUTTON, ) 

SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR. 

MAUD C. SNYDER President. 

BERTHA E. HAMMOND Vice-President. 

MINNIE H. SHERWOOD Recording Secretary. 

ANNIE M. BURR ' Treasurer. 

JULIA P. HUBBARD, n 

LAURA WESTCOTT, i Look-out Committee. 

C. C. BRAGDON, ) 

MARY K. FISHER, x 

PAULINE COLLINS, i Prayer-Meeting Committee. 

EVA L. COUCH, ) 

LUCY H. ROBERTS, \ ^ . ~ 

> 1 emperance Committee. 

MARY B. CUTLER, > 



Missionary Committee. 



MINNIE H. SHERWOOD, 1 

ALICE B. MALOON, \ 

LUCIE B. SAMPSON, > n/r . , r 

( Musicat Lom?nittee. 

CHARLOTTE A. WHITE, ( 



C5S) 




(iettyerela l/oc^al Quartette. 



MARTHA S. SLAVENS \st Soprano. 

NAN S. PEABODY id Soprano. 

GERTRUDE F. WOODBURY \st Alto. 

MARY L. SUTTON 2d Alto. 



piar/o-forte Quartettes. 



J>#<0< 



K. BELLE BRAGDON. 
LELLA M. NINDE. 
LOIS M. SOULE. 
EDNA M. LOWE. 



SADIE W. BURRILL. 
LAURA WESTCOTT. 
NELLIE M. RICHARDS. 
OLIVE L. MORRISON. 



NELLIE JOHNSON. 
KATHERINE E. HAMILTON. 
MILLIE E. WARREN. 
ELIZABETH E. WILLIAMS. 



BLANCHE B. SAGE. 
DAISY WILDER. 
MARIE SHELLABARGER. 
MARTHA S. SLAVENS. 



MARY L. MERRILL. 
ARLINE NORTHAM. 



H. MAY STERNBERG. 
MAUDE E. CARLL. 




(57) 




Orpfyeap ^lub. 



J. WALTER DAVIS, Conductor. 

NELLE G. DAVIS. MABEL L. ENGLEHART, 

MARY K. FISHER. 

MAUD M. EVANS. STELLA G. ENGLEHART 

FLORA M. GARDNER. KATHERINE E. HAMILTON. 

FANNIE LAMME. 
ELVA L. GIBSON. SARA B. HARVEY. 

EDNA E. LOWE. AUGUSTA L. PFAU. 

ANNA STALEY. 
NAN S. PEABODY. LUCY B. SAMPSON. 

MARY L. SUTTON. E. JOSEPHINE TICHENOR. 

LAURA G. WHITNEY. 

MARTHA S. SLAVENS. CHARLOTTE WHITE. 

GERTRUDE E. WOODBURY. 



(58) 




OuiTM ^ dB - 



3>@4 



MAUD C. SNYDER 



Leader. 



BERTHA E. HAMMOND. 



MAY E. RICE. 



BESSIE P. LOTHROP. 



SUSAN C. RICHARDS. 



ARLINE NORTHAM. 



LUCY B. SAMPSON. 



ANNITA L. PAINE. 



HELEN H. THRESHER. 



E. JOSEPHINE TICHENOR. 




(59) 




di^55 WJPK 



— oo>©^c 



PAULINE COLLINS. 
ADDIE H. COMMINS. 
MARY HOOD. 
BESSIE P. LOTHROP. 
NELLA W. SMITH. 



ALICE M. GOODELL. 
MARY A. HANMER. 
JULIA P. HUBBARD. 
MAY E. TOWLE. 
NETTIE F. WOODBURY. 




(6c) 



11 Oh, where are you going, love, thus arrayed ? ' 
11 I'm bound for the cooking-school," she said. 
" And where are you going ? " the maid replied. 
" 1 think I will go abroad," he sighed. 




soo^q <5C^55E5. 



oojo-;«>o 

THIRD YEAR. 

EVA R. BOND. ETHA E. PEARCE. 

FLORA M. GARDNER. NELLIE M. RICHARDS. 

LUCY E. SARGEANT. ANNA STALEY. 

DADIE C. SLAVENS. ELIZABETH E. WILLIAMS. 

SPECIALS. 

BESSIE P. LOTHROP. 
MARY L. MERRILL. 
ALICE M. GOODELL. 
GRACE SHELLABARGER. 



IDA E. COLBURN. 
FANNIE LAMME. 
NANCY ATKINSON. 
BERTIE O. BURR. 



(6i) 



prizes, 1889. 




BREAD-WINNERS. 



o-o^sejoc— 



First 

Second . 



. JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 

HELEN RICHMOND GILBERT, '89. 

(62) 




iUiLz-i 



r% 



1 1 funmijH^i 







Su/i/n/n"9<5. 



-^>o^c 



JULIA W. ANDERSON, 
EVA R. BOND, 

ANNE A. BROWN. 



ALICE M. COE, 

EVA L. COUCH. 

HELEN M. DODDS. 



JEAN F. EDGERTON, 
ALICE M. GOODELL, 
ALMA R. HUBBARD, 



MARGARET HUBBARD, 
JULIA P. HUBBARD, 
CARRIE B. JOHNSON. 



FANNIE LAMME, 
BESSIE P. LOTHROP, 
EDNA M. LOWE, 



DESDEMONA MILLIKEN, 
AUGUSTA L. PFAU, 
EMILY D. ROWE. 



SUSANNE L. ROWE, ANNA STALEY, 

GRACE SHELLABARGER, H. MAY STERNBERG, 

MARIE SHELLABARGER, M. VIRGINIA STOWE. 

WILLIE A. STOWE, 
KATHARINE C. WATSON, 
CHARLOTTE A. WHITE. 



(63) 




/ttalapta <<Jub. 



NAN S. PEABOUY, President. 

SARA B. HARVEY, Secretary. 

ANNITA L. PAINE, Treasurer. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, Ground Manager. 




(6 4 ) 



\ 




Jupiata Qub. 



Cockswain. 
FANNY LOUISE BURRIDGE. 

FRANCES W. BARBOUR, 'Sg. NAN S. PEABODY, '91. 
AMELIA C. HARRIS. ETHA E. PEARCE, '90. 

ELIZABETH HARWOOD, '89. DAISE E. SHRYOCK. 
GRACE HAVENS. ANNA STALEY, '92. 

EULA LEE. 

(^5) 



Ca5<?II BattalioQ. 



OFFICERS. 



Capt. WILLIAM L. FOX, Commanding Officer. 

Company A. 

Captain . 

MINNIE H. SHERWOOD. 

Lieutenants. 
NAN S. PEABODY. E. JOSEPHINE TICHENOR. 

Sergeants. 
NETTIE F. W T OODBURY. HELEN M. DODDS. 

EFFIE M. PRICKETT, 

Corporals. 
JULIA T. WOLFE. IDA R. SIMPSON. 

MAUDE E. WHITNEY. ANNITA L. PAINE. 

Company B. 

Captain. 
MARY L. SUTTON. 

Lieutenants . 
LOIS M. SOULE. DESDEMONA MILLIKEN. 

Sergeants. 
SADIE W. BURRILL. MAUDE W. LITTLEFIELD. 

REBECCA R. SHEPHERD. 

Corporals. 
ALICE M. GOODELL. ANNA STALEY. 

JESSIE M. BALL. ARLINE NORTHAM. 

Company C. 
Captain . 
ADDIE H. COMMINS. 

Lieutenants . 
JULIA P. HUBBARD. LELLA M. NINDE. 

Sergeants. 
ANNE M. BROWN. LIZZIE W. DAVIS. 

SUSAN C. RICHARDS. 

Corporals. 
EDITH SIDWAY. MARY K. FISHER. 

LAURA WESTCOTT. MAY L. RICE. 

(67) 



KjM&Mc • MfcATB 






Published every month throughout the school 
year, by a Board of Editors elected once in three 
months . 



first ^erm. 

MARY L. SUTTON, Editor. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

FLORA Iff. GARDNER. GERTRUDE P. REYNOLDS. 

ANNITA L. PAINE. LTJCY B. SAMPSON. 

NAN S. PEABODY. LUCY E. SARGEANT. 
IDA R. SIMPSON. 



Seconb ^erm. 



JULIA P. HUBBARD, .... Editor. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

MINNIE H. SHERWOOD. GUSSIE L. PFAU. 

LOIS M. SOULE. ANNE M. BROWN. 

SADIE W. BURRILL. EFFIE M. PICKETT. 



MINNIE H. SHERWOOD, .... Editor. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

NELLIE M. RICHARDS. ANNITA L. PAINE. 

MAUD C. SNYDER. GERTRUDE P. REYNOLDS. 

ANNIE M. BURR. JESSIE M. BALL. 



ETHA E. PEARCE, . . . Business Manager. 

(69) 



'89 ©lass ©ay 



pYogy&mme. 



© <2> 



MEDLEY. 

President's Address, 

Auto-Harp. 

Class History 

Song, 

Legends of Lasell, 

Piano-Forte, 

Recitation, 

Violin, 

Song, 

Class Prophecy, 



MAUDE E. MATHEWS 

CARRIE M. BROWN 

JOSEPHINE BOGART 

FRANCES W. BARBOUR 

LEAH COUTS 

MAUDE OLIVER 

HELEN GILBERT 

ELIZABETH HARWOOD 

EDITH I. GALE 

WINNIE BELLE EWING 



Oration, 



Elegy, 



awi-> (§<xep©iiei), 



Planting of The Tree. 

MARY W. PACKARD 

Burning of The Books. 

. GRACE C. HUNTINGTON 



(70) 



'8a Cla^ 




Winnie Belle Ewing. Music by Frances W. Barbour. 

I. 

E are twelve little maidens ! 



w 



Each little maiden, her head all laden, 

With the legend " '89. " 

Une bien venue we give to you, 
And right boldly do design, 

To 
Fascinate, captivate, infatuate, agitate, 
Intoxicate, animate, stimulate, intimidate, 
Subjugate, cultivate, recreate, satiate, 
Every one of you before we're through, 
We do, we do, w r e do, we do. 

We come this class night, our hearts gay and light, 
For we are the great, the glorious, the Lasell Seniors, 
The Faculty at last forget our misdemeanors, 
Rules we've disobeyed, naughty pranks we've played, 
We've ne'er been very good, though the best we could, 
Still we fondly opine, when we our place resign, 
You'll greatly miss the Class of '89. 

II. 

We are twelve little maidens ! 
Each little maiden, her brain all laden, 
With knowledge, oh ! such a store ! 
Four are the years, many the tears, 
Spent in acquiring this lore, 

Of 
Metrology, theology, geology, photology, 
Phonology, thermalogy, histology, biology, 
Zoology, idealogy, mineralogy, anthropology, 
All the ologies of the colleges. 

(70 



The Greek we speak, Franeais is play, 

We philosophize and we analyze, 

We are cognizant of the history of all nations, 

We speak fluently of concomitant variations, 

We've been through quadratics, we're up in pneumatics, 

We cook, we swim, we sew, we play the piano, 

We can swing a club well, we can do a dumb bell, 

Oh ! all our accomplishments we can ne'er tell. 

III. 

We are twelve little maidens ! 
Each little maiden, her heart all laden, 
With sorrow both deep and true. 
School-days are done, the time is come 
We must say farewell to you, 

With 
Lamentation, lacrymation, trepidation, agitation, 
Prostration, perturbation, suspiration, prosternation, 
Tribulation, vexation, irritation, desolation, 
And every atom of creation. 

Farewell, farewell, to you, to you, 

We bid you, O Lasell, a last fond farewell ! 

But though sundering time and space may force us far apart, 

Still shall love for Alma Mater glow warm in every heart. 

Praise to her we'll tender, unto her will render 

Our deathless fealty, and bend the loyal knee. 

Across the phantom years we look with doubts and fears, 

Though smiles wreathe our lips, our hearts are full of tears. 






(72) 




JJti Csstntiil „l T/dli/^ 




flvSvNo 




£)u £)iner £)e 'Cable £)u Qote- 

Du ^ardi-gras, 1890. 



Julienne. 






Coulibac a la russe. 



Noodle. 



Filly de soul. 



Backfisch. 

€nivkz. 

Heurige Pautoffelu. Cram berry. A rare bit of Welsh. 

Coquette a la mode. 

G-reen Dandy Lions. Pickled Billie. Jelly Fish. 

Salade de Ptomaines. Patti de Salmon. 

Wild Goose. Dear. Bore. 

Stewed Irish. Beef stake. 

Mutton Chops a la puree de pommes. Spanferkel. Kalbskopf. 



'BtzzvL 



Sahara a la creme. Charlotte Pusse. 

Fromage debris. 



Biscuits de Savant. 



Dine ZisL 



Roman Punches. 
Cafe au lait (without Milk) 



Water. 
Circus Lemonade. 



Bier. 

(74) 




^ 5rip to Bettor?, 



1L Jf\SS A.?" — "Here!" — "Miss B.? " — " Here !" — " Miss 

I y I C. ? " - tk Here ! " — " Miss D. ? " — " Here ! " — " All here. 
f r Young ladies, are you all ready? Have you your leggings 
and overshoes on ? Now, do not be too forward ; do not 
stare, but walk straight down the street, looking neither to the front 
nor to the rear." While down at the station the bell rang which 
announces the approaching train. "What was that?"— "Do you 
'spose 'tis a fire?" — " Be calm, young ladies; remember you are now 
in the world, and must not allow trifles to disturb you. Here is the 
train." 

The sidewalk is blocked ; the train steps are blocked ; every one is 
growing cross and impatient. The conductor tries to disperse the 
crowd ; but no, the roll is being called, and no one can proceed until it is 
finished. All are finally checked in regular order, and the procession 
moves on, with umbrellas, bags, and waterproofs, down through short 
alleys which they call streets. The impatient crowd rushes forward as 
the obstruction is removed, and everything that day goes wrong in 
business. " Come, let's go in here. I want to see that." The teacher 
hesitates — stops — then from the depths of some unknown produces a 
paper, — peruses it. " It is not on your list." Folds the paper, returns 
it to the unknown, rechecks the baggage, and the train again moves. 
" Wonder what all those people are looking at; there must be some- 
thing awfully funny over here." — "Miss A., what are you doing?" 
— " Trying to find out what they are looking at." — " It is yourself; 
you are a very forward young lady, and shall henceforth accompany 
me." 

At last that terrible procession reached its first destination, after being 
laughed at, stared at, howled at, hooted at, etc., etc. 

The list again comes forth. " Miss B., you wish to purchase one- 
quarter of a yard of ribbon ; we will accompany you. — No, not the 
best ; she must not be extravagant. Extravagance, my dear child, is 
the root of all evil. Now, Miss C, I see you want to buy a dress. 
Get gray ; that is a quiet color, and will not attract attention on the 
street. No, you cannot go alone; you might see a man. How im- 
proper for you to think of such a thing! " Around they go, all with 

(75) 



each, until the resources of that store are finally exhausted. The order, 
"Fall in! Attention to roll-call!" is heard. "What! one gone!" 
They all disperse to find her, and such a bustle as there was in that 
store. Some thought it was fire ; some mice ; all showed an equal 
amount of push. Ten minutes — the last one has arrived ; fifteen 
minutes — the girls are here, but no teacher ; seventeen, — ah ! here she 
is. They march out in single file in search of more worlds to conquer. 

"Wait a moment, I must have a drink of soda-water,— no, you 
don't need to wait; I'll catch — " — "Miss D. ! What h the matter? 
Say no more about soda-water." . . . "Oh! I must have my hair 
cut. I forgot all about it before. Come on ! " — " Miss D., do you not 
understand that you can do nothing that is not on your list? " — "Well, 
shoes are on my list." — "Yes, but you cannot have high heels." — 
"Well, then, I won't buy any; low shoes hurt my feet." For some 
time all went well, with " mum " for the countersign, but that was for- 
gotten when one of the girls spied some delicious molasses candy in a 
window. "I must have some of that candy; the state of my health 
requires it." — " If you are in such delicate health the best place for you 
is home." How comforting that was! Another store was reached; 
but such experiences! I wonder any of the innocents survived. One 
blessing, no one was lost. Then to the train. It is just the day to run 
for a train ; muddy, slippery, windy, — all conducive to running grace- 
fully with the arms full of bundles. One, in her mad haste and vain 
endeavors to keep up with the rest, head down, with full force runs into 
a poor, unoffending man vainly trying to keep out of her way. He can 
do nothing after, for she has knocked all the breath right out of him, 
and no doubt he is still standing there looking for it. The poor girl is 
now far behind, but she starts and makes desperate efforts to regain 
her companions ; her efforts seem fruitless, but at last she turns around, 
and going backwards (just like a girl), soon overtakes them. Finally, 
they reach the station, just in time to see the vanishing 








4.50 TRAIN. 



(76) 



<§o \1qe §wee( f^eet. 



'91 <?las5~plou;er. 



m 

p tt|e Sweet Pea bright, 
Witri n\any shades bediglnt 
Loyalty We offer, 
Love to it We proffer. 

Our own class-flower to be, 
Fragrant ar^d snqall Sweet Pea 
Bloorr] beside all Waters, 
Fairest of Eartly's daughters. 

By tt\e lady's bower, 
Beside r\all ar\d tower, 
TY\y face is ever sweet, 
R joy to all wr|0 rqeet, 

Teact\ lis tt\er] our duty 
Tl|roUgr| tl\y dainty beauty; 
To sirrile arid Iqappy be, 
Ever bright liKe tr\ee. 



(77) 




Qippi'9^5 f r °ffl ty<( l^au^s. 




s. 
p. 

tune 
and 

S. 

P. 



UB- FRESH, (to dignified post-gradu- 
ate) : "Are you a Freshman? " 

P. G. : "No; I am a post-graduate." 
F. : "Why, what's a post-graduate? " ^^ 

G . : " Oh, it's a girl that has the misfor- 

to come back to a school after she has graduated from it, 
slowly petrify to a post." 

F. (horrified) : " Oh, how awful ! " 

G. (collapses). 



A classical Sophomore translates "Nubes est niger " : "The nigger from 
Nubia." 



A "crazy" Lasell maiden, looking in the bottom of her tea-cup, said, 
" I wonder if I shall have to ask permission to leave these grounds? " 

The voice of the hand-organ is heard in the land. 



The most dangerous thing uncaged, — a full-fledged Senior. 



It is no use, this year, to guess ages, for appearances are deceitful. 



No more mice. The ferrets have finished them. 



A YOUNG lady asserts that maple-sugar makes mustaches starchy. True; 
but how should she know? 



(78) 



EDMUND SPENCER must have foreseen Miss Call's concentration when he 
wrote the following line: — 

" Toured out in looseness on the grassy ground." 



I i o her: "Name Tennyson's best poem." 
GlRL : " Marble Faun." 



A LITTLE maid, 

So timid, said, 
" I'll go to the tank and swim." 

Oh, how she did boast! 

But gave up the ghost 
When she was fairly in. 



SUGGESTIONS. 

Occupants of rooms will not be held responsible for damage done to 
furniture. Therefore, do not put furniture against the steam-pipes, the 
treatment is too mild; but cut your names all over it, and if you are in 
the studio, procure paint, and besmear the furniture with the latest shades. 

Do not close the door quietly; slam it, so the latch will break about twice 
a term, and the glass in the transom shatter over your head like a summer 
shower. 

Do not use the picture-hooks; pins, tacks, screws, and nails will suffice. 

Do not use the steps except in case of fire; but plant your foot firmly on 
the cane-seated chairs, and don't be alarmed if you go through. 

Cut your names in the windows, and if you do not possess a " head-light " 
with which to do the work, borrow one. 

Do not hesitate to remove from another room any piece of furniture you 
may fancy, and take from your own all superfluous pieces. 

Do not use chairs all the time; you will find the beds comfortable and 
convenient. 

Do not use scrap-baskets; they are out of date. Throw all things out of 
the window or behind the bureau. 

Do not reprimand friends for sitting upon the towel-racks. There will be 
extra charges for water used to wash mirrors and windows. 



Lost — an hour of sleep. Cat concert at 3 A.M., daily. Will an old girl 
please forward a bottle of cat poison, or her brother with a gun, if the former 
article is not obtainable? Who says we prefer the brother? 



Who was the smallest man in the Bible? 
Peter; because he slept on his watch. 

(79) 



w 






^opuijdmms. 



HY is the Seminary horse like a French clock ? 
Because he goes by jerks. 



Why are the members of the Junior Class like the Lowell 
mill-hands ? 
Because they are always on a strike. 

Which is the most musical corridor in Lasell Seminary ? 
The one which contains the Lutes. 

Why is Lasell Seminary like a tree ? 

Because it sends out leaves sometimes brightly colored and some- 
times green. 

Why is a Lasell girl on Sunday morn like a bar-room ? 
Because she is full of champagne. 

Why does the librarian like abridged editions ? 
Because they are like her dresses — short. 

Why is Lasell such a delightful place on Saturday night? 
Because then the girls are all candid. 

Why are the Juniors a protective force in themselves ? 

Because they can boast Richards, Roberts, John'son, and a Sargeant, 
a Baker, a Thresher and Evan(s) a Colburn ; all are Bent on combat- 
ing free-trade, and, withal, man embraces woman. 



fSo) 




(80 



/T^Iap^e. 



SPECIAL. — What are you going to do with the money from 
your entertainment? 
Junior. — I really can't say. 

Special. — Well, I heard Miss P say they didn't know how much 

the Animal would cost. 

It has been rumored that Miss S could have graduated with '90, 

but desiring more boarding-school life, she has decided to wait for the 
larger Class of '91. 

No orders for masculine attire received by telephone. 
Who has been to see the Gypsies ? 



LASELL'S GRANDCHILDREN. 
Act I. 



Coasting. 



Act II. 
Smash-up. 

Act III. 

First grandchild. — You had no business to run into me. 

Second grandchild. — You should have got out of the way, I couldn't 
stop. 

First grandchild. — Well, you didn't need to start. 

Second grandchild. — How did I know you were going to get in the 
way? 

First grandchild. — You near cut my arm in two, anyway. 

Second grandchild. — That's nothing, you've got two. 



AUCTION IN CHAPEL, 2 P.M. 

One object of auctions to get things to their owners. 
Handkerchiefs made of Cashmere lace. 
Election of trotters. 

Anything breakable thrown for examination. 

Fancy bids on utensils for housekeeping when the latter is not too 
uncertain. 

(S3) 



t 




r^ie Faculty 



IS nine o'clock, 

Tick, tock, tick, tock, 

Gaily, my girls, heig'ho ! 

When the chapel bell 

Doth sound its knell, 

Sadly my girls, so ho ! 

To prayers to go, 

It means, we know, 

To listen to song, 

And much that is long. 

To sit and shake, 

And quiver and quake, 

Lest called to recite a hymn, O! 

Professor Bragdon leads the line 
Of teachers learned numbering nine; 
Great and little, one and ail, 
They cross the threshold of the hall. 

The dark-haired leader finds the place, 
They sing a song and ask the grace; 
Then to the maids who there do sit 
He always reads a new " choice bit." 

A pile of letters in her hand, 
For teachers and girls, from every land, 
Miss Carpenter gives each morn and eve, 
But not to open 'till you leave. 

Miss Chamberlayne now up does start, 
Which sends a chill to every heart, 
Not to reprove, but to invite 
To a laundry reception given at night. 

To " speak the speech " there now does rise 

A woman of diminutive size; 

Her one desire is to know 

" If all are breathing sure and slow." 



(83) 



But one now rushes from his place, 
A real live man with blushing face; 
Fresh from college he came here, 
Girls to teach but girls to fear. 

The tiny learned woman there, 
Sitting in the organ chair, 
Is full of Greek and Latin old, 
Strange as you may think it told. 

Mathematics and Art go hand in hand; 
Geometry rules but Art will stand. 
The straight line is the line of duty, 
The curved line is the line of beauty." 

A figure now with martial tread, 
With sloping shoulders and curly head, 
Comes with method, newly made, 
Of concentration for every maid. 

The German Fraulein over there, 
With light blue eyes and golden hair, 
Starts to her feet, in accents stern, 
Gives out a lesson none can learn. 

As from the chapel out they go, 
The Hills are echoing sounds all know, 
With greeting bright and skilful pun, 
He into the music-room doth run. 

A singer comes blithely up the hall, 
With smile and pleasant joke for all; 
Davis his name, with stick and book, 
Over his glasses he doth look. 

The middle of June 
Came none too soon; 
Gaily my girls, heigho ! 
With the end of school 
And every rule; 
Heigho, my girls, heigho! 
Miss Chamberlayne fair 
With soft gray hair; 
Professor Bragdon, 
Driving the wagon; 
Professor Rich 
And teachers six; 
And last, Far (e) well. 

(8 4 ) 



''mS^J^S^^ 




OUR OLDEST MEMBER. 




/T\opday /Husip^s. 



-oOie<Oo- 



T 



f IS the mystic hour of three, and lo ! they come — the great, the good, 
the noble from all climes. For two hours shall Lasell open wide 
her arms to those who have been granted " permission to call." From 
my accustomed window-seat, I am drawn, unresistingly, into a 
vortex of conflicting emotions, as I await the appearance of the first callers. 
They must be now on their way, for 'tis fully two minutes since the scream of 
the locomotive whistle, and clanging of its bell, announced the arrival of the 
three o'clock train. How aggravatingly quiet is the air, how calm the breeze, 
and alas! how muddy are the streets! I wonder if they will wear rubbers; if 
not, farewell to gloss and polish. Why don't they come? Could no one have 
accepted our hospitality? At last ! and 'tis a Harvard man — a Freshman, 
too, I can tell by his swagger, and the cane, with which he beats the poor, 
inoffensive air. How nimbly he springs over muddy places, and then smiles 
with utter self-sufficiency as he gains the opposite side ! Now he is fumbling 
for his card, fully a half-square away. He is bowing; he cannot surely mean 
me, nor my neighbor, but I guess he bows simply because he is nearing 
Lasell. How gallant are these Harvard Freshmen ! What a contrast ! The 
next one is surely a " Theolog," for he treads the ground with the true lofti- 
ness of a great spirit, and his brow is knitted as he wends his way toward the 
Seminary. He is evidently considering some difficult problem of moral 
reform. Oh ! who is the maiden to whom he will expound his theories during 
the next two hours? Behind him, appear two boyish figures — Exeter boys, 
I think. They giggle and nudge each other with an easiness and grace 

(86) 



which would do credit to a girl at sweet sixteen. They will probably divulge 
schemes for great escapades with their fair friends, this afternoon, which will 
never be realized, owing to the diligent and loving care of the faculties con- 
cerned. 

And here comes L.'s cousin(?). Well, perhaps he is her cousin; at any 
rate, they seem to enjoy each other's company far more than ordinary cousins. 
The bashful country youth now comes to view, and I must admit I like him, 
for the simple reason that he does not act as if he knew it all. 'Tis a relief 
to come across such people occasionally, among all the wit and fashion usually 
crowding our parlors. That man with the crush hat I can tell is a cynic. 
Note the curve of his lips, and the nonchalance with which he meets the 
curious gaze of the upper stories. He will, doubtless, convince some tender, 
little maiden that life's all a farce, and that the sooner she realizes it, and draws 
down the corners of her pretty mouth, the better. Forming a dignified rear- 
guard come the fond papas and mammas who have availed themselves of this 
kind permission of the powers which ought not to be, by which they may 
see their devoted children for two hours. Under the present system of dis- 
cipline and education it is not considered best for parents and their children 
to become too well acquainted. 

And thus they come every Monday. Sometimes I sit here for a half-hour, 
and no one comes to gladden my eyes; again, I am rendered nearly dizzy 
by the multitudinous types of humanity which pass before me as in a panorama. 
Farther than the door I may not follow them, though some of my mates, 
less timid, venture to promenade from 3 to 5 through the long corridors 
through which these festive youths must pass. But such a course is dangerous. 
Hidden rocks obstruct the way oftentimes, and so seriously affect the unsus- 
pecting offenders that they are compelled to retire to their rooms. 

The advantages of these afternoons are many. The unsophisticated 
maiden is rendered conversant with all the engrossing topics of the day, and 
begins to realize what life really is when she meets her brother's " Yale 
chum." A delicious whiff of the naughty outside world is brought in by 
these friends, and permeates the whole school, so that by five every girl feels 
as if she had received a call, as she hears the rustling of best frocks and hur- 
ried steps when the visitor is announced. Then, too, we should forget 
entirely how the noble sex look were it not for these inventions of a genial 
spirit, for there is but one specimen of the race in Auburndale, and we see 
him wandering past the school gently whistling but once a month. 

'Tis the fateful hour of five. The hands of the big hall clock linger re- 
proachfully on the hour, and the pendulum ticks but louder to warn those who 
tarry of the fate which has been known to befall the tardy ones. A hasty 
" Good-by," a gentle wave of hat — hurried foot-falls — and away they go — 
Freshman, Junior, Theolog, and Swell alike. A scream of that merciless five 
o'clock whistle, the jingle of a bell, and our Monday is over. 

'90. 



(S7) 



©affjering 3m-3$w$%. 



[In the Freshman Days of the present Junior Class, our first per- 
emptory summons from the Seniors on their "Class Day," was to 
"Gather the dew-drops from the grass in the afternoon," it having been 
raining for two days. This was done and recorded in verse, which we 
take this opportunity of presenting to the public, as illustrative of our 
early days. J 



f Jgrcn 



grave ar\d potest seniors -^e-, 
R frest\n\ar\ class 
Tt\at lightly Isolds its place, 
Yet feels tl\e Wortl} of every lass, 
Rr\d ^witri trie tirqe Keeps pace. 

I rnet a Serqir\ary girl, 

Sl\e ^as fresl\ fron\ school, sr\e said. 
Her t\air \s^as tlric^ "Witt\ rqarvy a curl 

Tt\at clustered 'rour\d l\er l\ead. 

Sl\e Jqad a learrfed, studious air, 

Sr\d st\e ^Was sinvply clad, 
R pail sr\e bore -witl\ greatest care. 

Her rqerrirqerrt n\ade rqe glad. 

" Classn\ates, ar\d convrades, little rqaid, 
Hovi n\ar\y rqay you be?" 

" Ho~w ir\aryy? SeVeri irj all," srje said, 
Rr\d ^or\derir\g looked at rqe. 

" Hr\d "Wi\ere are tl\ey, I pray you say?" 

Sf\e aqs^Wered, " Sever\ are -we," 
Tv^o of us t\ave gor\e a^way, 

JRLr\d five you i\ere n\ay see. 

T^Wo of Us t\aVe gor\e a-Way 

lit tl\e "Wisl\ of tl\e ser\ior class 

To gather ^hjle it yet is day 

Tl\e de^w-drops frorq tl\e grass. 

Five of us are Westerr} girls, 

Or\e frorq tl\e Soutlj -we boast, 

JLrjd or\e stiff, quiet Bostorj girl 
To balance tl\e fairy t\pst. 

Tt\roUgl\ tl\e er\suir\g years 

De-W-drops ^We'll gladly plUcK, 

Ur\til We yield to ser\ior fears, 
Rr\d call tl\e fresi\rqer\ up. 



(88) 



U/apt^d. 

OO get out of the Freshman Class. 
Powder to cover blushes. 
Every one to buy a copy of the Allerlei. 
To marry as soon as she graduates. 
Standing permission to go to Boston. 
Sore throat one day in the week. 
An editor-in-chief who has some wit. 

To keep awake one night to see what it is to go to sleep. 
To stick pins in the wall. 
To learn to play Galilee on the banjo. 
To argue for protection. 
Some candy. 

Two dollars for stolen library books. 

Something to eat, hair-pins, mucilage, ink, pins, stamps, 
and a wrapper. 

To be a society belle. 
A Lasell song. 

Education and not . 

Some information concerning " when I was in Rome." 



(3 9 ) 



]y[flke j-fay Y/hile the |un |hines. 




^ev] \zvar?oereo t^roagF? tlpe f^a^fielo 
J\.yb t\je sur> Vvas s^ii^ii^g bri^tpt ; 
He Was tall, erect, aipo ^ai^osorr^e, 
S^e, Vervj fair to tlpe sigF;t. 

ol^e Was a farrier's oaag'r^ter, 
i-Yi^o a farriers §09 Was l^e: 
He tl^oug^t l^er goo6 ai^o gentle, 
SWeet as a r^aio sl^oulo be. 

He tolo l^er tF?at l^e loVeo \jer 
jA.r?o asl^eo l^er to be f^is Wife, 
Saio tlpat l^e'o eVer cf^erisl^ 
iAi^o protect [per Witl^ l^is life, 

Sl^e tur^eo l^er sWeet face to h^ir^ 
aVi^o f^e oreW l^er ge^tlvj ipear, 
GoVereo l^er lips Vvi t fp pisses 
'Sill sl^e sigl^eo, " J loVe vjou, 6ear." 

(oh^e sar? sai^ o'er tF?e n^eaooW 
Before tl^e tWo ^orr^eWaro Wer?t, 
12 l^opes tt^at 6av| arisei^ 
All tl^eir future liVes Were ber?t. 



(90 



Boo^$ ttyat tyave f^lped m^. 



:>>«=;<*>- 



Thresher : " She Wanted to Marry a Colonel." 

Richards : " Life." 

Winsor: " A Fool's Errand." 

Woodbury: "Baby-land." 

Johnson : u Un Jeune Homme Panvre." 

Hubbard : u How to Become Beautiful." 

Baker: " Musical Record." 

Roberts : u Confessions of a Bashful Man." 

Peabody : u Dress." 

Evans : " Encyclopaedias to Vol. VIII." 

Sargeant : " Helen's Babies." 

Colburn : ww Tyndall on Sound." 

Benton: wt Mrs. Lincoln's Cook-book." 

Harvey : " How to be Happy though Married." 

Snyder : "Jordan, Marsh, & Co.'s latestvocal collection." 




(92) 



Fflttn> 22, I89O. 



/? 



good masquerade is a girl's delight; 
And on Saturday eve with faces bright, 
Lasell girls met at quarter of eight, 
George Washington's birth to celebrate. 
For days before the great event 
Everything in the school was lent ; 
And divers persons, great and small, 
Helped fill the hall at our Fancy Ball. 
Among the first who came that night 
Was fair Ophelia robed in white; 
Behind her came a swell young dude, 
With cane of enormous magnitude ; 
With tinkling bells the jesters came; 
And three, four Georges of hatchet fame ; 
The Spanish student ; a Chinese maid ; 
A girl as Paul Kauvar arrayed ; 
Morning and Night ; Lord Fauntleroy ; 
A dairy-maid; and a fisher-boy; 
Peasants ; and lords of high degree ; 
The Englishman ; and the poor Chinee, 
All made a scene so bright, so grand, 
That it seemed like a glimpse of fairyland. 
After refreshments at half-past nine, 
(Which all pronounced as very fine,) 
The ball dismissed with a closing dance; 
And we hope, if ever we have the chance, 
To meet again in the same old hall 
And enjoy another Fancy Ball. 

(94) 




f\ <5at^l?ism. 




.RESH. (just entered). — Hello, Senior! 
Sen.— Well, Fresh. 
Fresh. — What is that, Senior? 
Sen. — The gong, my child. 
Fresh. - What for? 
6*67/. — To tear you from the window and the loving " Exeter Dudes" 
close by. 

Fresh . — Who are dudes? 

Sen. — Those who go out carriage-driving with girls. 
Fresh. — What's this? 

Sen. — Our oldest inhabitant in a glass case, you chump. 
Fresh. — What are those? 

Sen. — Weapons used in time of war; can't you see? 
Fresh. — Great guns ! what's that noise? 
Sen. — Only the girls doing their breathers. 
/r r ^._ Who's Prof.? 

Sen. — The man who has charge of your behavior; a friend in 
need, who pockets you in his den of dens, and administers a dose far 
more effective than throwing you into the swimming-tank, sans pre- 
server. 

Fresh. (Another awful noise). — What's that? 
Sen. — Only the Orphean Club practising. 
Fresh. — Do you have vacations here? 
Sen. — Not unless you cross the Styx. 
Fresh. — How do you get good marks here? 

Sen. — Going to prayer-meetings, sitting on front seats, taking drill, 
never expressing your own views, keeping your schedule correct, giving 
to the poor, airing your bed, and never speaking above a whisper. 
Fresh. — Where is "Walker's Political Economy"? 
Sen. — You will find it on the second shelf upon the left, but the 
book you are looking for has been stolen. 




(95) 



He JftSGLL QlRL. 



1. 

Tl\e Lasell girl's bright ar\d airy, 
Ligtrt arjd trippirig as a fairy, 
Hll tt\e felloes Waryt to rr\arry 
Tl\e Lasell Girl. 

St\e is Wise ar)d very pretty, 
Sl^e car\ Garble arid be "Witty, 
First tfjey love tier, ttierj tl\ey pity 
Trie Lasell Girl. 

3. 
Stje car] errtertairi tt\e Corifererice, 

But does frorr\ tt\erri draw tt\e inference 

Tl\at lxlr\cr[ is rryacti tl^eir prefererice, 

Not Lasell Girl. 

4. 
St\e car\ borrow frorri t\er neighbors, 

Never rest, tl\oUql\, frorri t\er labors, 

Lorigs for sigtrt of Genua ri Favors, 

Trie Lasell Girl. 

5. 
Stre is rioted for rjer costilrqes, 

Ever) rr\ortar-boards ar\d r\eir-loorr\s, 

For t|er cl^eeKs wt(ereori tt[e rose bloorrrs, 

Trie Lasell Girl. 

6. 
Stre is always very jolly, 

Sorqetiiries giver] o'er to folly, 

Narked, frorq Shakespeare Up to Polly, 

Tije Lasell Girl. 

7. 
Witt[ tioriors stje car) graduate, 

R prize for bread Will corriperisate 

Tl\e n\ari wtpse pxirse s tie 11 irrutilate, 

Ttie Lasell Girl. 

(96) 



• » 



I^ome fetters C or) ^ Q5 ^ e ^ 



Aubumdale, Lasell Seminary, Sunday, P.M. 
My dear Papa, — / received the check you sent me in your last letter, and 
am very, very much obliged. Expenses do count up so fearfully here ! I 
have been extremely economical, but still I have no money left, and please 
won't you send me another check by return mail ? I have not paid for my 
Patti tickets yet, nor my new spring gown, so you see I would like some 
money as soon as possible. Hastily. 

Your loving daughter, 

MAY. 



Aubumdale, Lasell Seminary, Sunday, PM. 

My own dear Mamma, — I can write but a short letter to-day, as I have 

been washing my hair, and it took so long to dry. My back is nearly broken 

from leaning out of the window, so that my head might be in the sun. Went 

to church this morning and nearly fell asleep, but a pun which the minister 

made zvoke me up. Am just dying for vacation to come, so as to see you. 

IIoiv are all the folks ? I am well, and hope you are the same. I would xvrite 

more but am so pressed for time to-day. 

With oceans of love, 

I remain, 

Your dear daughter, 

MAY. 

P.S. Have you called on Mrs. Ainszvorth lately ? M. 



Aubumdale, Lasell Seminary, Sunday, P.M. 
My dear Jim, — Lf you are coming out to our next recital you might 
invite your friend Mr. Ainsworth to come with you. He seems to be a very 

(97) 



nice young man, and I think yon might cultivate his acquaintance more 

with great advantage to yourself. Not but what you are perfection already, 

dear, still you understand what I mean. 

In great haste, 

Your loving sister, 

MAY. 



{Merely Extracts?) 

Auburndale, Lasell Seminary, Sunday, P.M. 

My dear George, — / received your last letter Saturday noon, and I suppose 
you are angry because I have not anstvered it sooner, but it is not my fault, 
for really I have had no time until nozv 

You must not write me such long letters, for they bulge out the envelopes, 
and- are so heavy that Miss Carpenter eyes mg suspiciously every time she 
hands me one in chapel. .... 

I am glad you thought Miss L. looked so "very charming'''' at the last 
German her mother gave, /guess it is the first time any one ever said that 
of her. For my part I detest those fair, pink-and-white kind of girls ; but still 
if I liked them as well as you do Fd call on them a dozen times a week too. It 
is strange where you find time to write me at all. One thing, however, I 
zvould like you to please remember : don't write me anything more about your 
Germans, and parties at home. You must think I am intensely interested 
in them when I can't be there myself. I am so glad, though, that you enjoy 
them; but isn't the crowd frightfully promiscuous ? .... 

If you care to do so, you may come out to our next recital with my brother 
Jim. I hardly expect to see you, though, as you probably have an engagement 
to take Miss I. somewhere on that evening. If such is the case, don't, for any 
consideration, think of coming. I wouldn't have you disappoint her for 
worlds 

{And so her letter runs on for ten or twelve pages more?) I haven't said 
half I wished to, but there goes the bell, so I must stop. 

Sincerely, 

MAY. 




(9S) 



Oop 



■ercior^. 



Sl^ere Was a school. 
Cohere Vvere [oar girls, 

Or?e Was tF?ir? ; 

Orje Vvas sr^sul ; 
o^evi greVv a^o greW 
oo seniors all ; 

Or?e Vvas fat, 

Oi^e Was tall ; 
Stpev] Vver^t to college, 
So lool^ for l^oVvleoge, 

Or?e got it, 

Or^e l^ept it, 

Or?e trieo it, 

O^e left it, 
JM.II together Vvei^t aWavj 
S^evj'll retarr? to as son^e oavj, 



(99) 



FKorp H aN " a ™ 



©KncJ figftt Rail*, 
^tafefij mien, 
^ei^L) fair, 
florae Goifft fter 



<rz 



V2>an compare. 

Ho fea&eft? 
|)fte ^a& come, 
Manij a mjfe, 
©Jar frorr} ^ome, 
©Kero^ fancj, 
<J\ero&/& foam, 

(Ho Rijt§> moffter 
^|>aic[ a cftifiL, 

|5fte'*l> not" coifiL, 
|)fte'/& foo oolite, 
©KniL too mjfc[." 

(ioo) 




^rrou;-^eads. 



>>»<< 



"Satire is my Weapon.'" 



N. J-hns-n. — "• Prone to argue." 
F. Sw— ft. — " She seldom smiles." 

D. W-ld-r. — " Here's to the maiden of bashful fifteen." 

E. G-bs-n. — "So sad, so tender, and so true." 
K. H-m-lt-n. — "Merry little mountain maid." 

A. H-bb-rd. — " She moves a goddess and she looks a 
queen." 

B. W— ll ms. — " Dar's something wrong a-brewin'." 

L. N-nd-. — " Love in that gentle heart is quickly learned." 

B. H-mm-nd. — "I thought so once, and now I know it." 

C. J-hns-n. — " Order is Heaven's first law." 

D. W-ns-r. — " The woman that deliberates is lost." 
M. L-ms-n. — " Oh, tell them, they are men." 

B. S-G-. — u Linked sweetness long drawn out." 
F G-rdn-r. — u I to myself am dearer than a friend." 

dm) 



M. Ev-ns. — " Grave, without dullness; learned, without 

pride." 

E. L— w-. — " She has a cool, collected look, as if her 

pulses beat by book." 

M. S-tt-n. — " For we that live to please." 

G. R-yn-lds. — " Saved you one." 

E. Pr-ck-tts. — " Wretched, un-idead girl." 

E. S-dw-y. — " She is no light coquette." 

E. B-nd. — " Her mind was much to learning bent." 

M. W-rr-n. — " Life is a jest, and all things show it." 

E. C ch. — " Man wants but little here below, nor wants 

that little long." 

M. St-rnb-rgh. — " She sleeps, my lady sleeps." 
S. B-k-r. — u Knowledge is proud that she has learned so 
much." 

F. H-w-s. — "Those beaming looks and dear, deluding 
eyes." 

N. D-v— s. — " Creation's heir, the world, the world is 
mine." 

M. L-t-s. — " Wisdom shall die with you." 

S. Engl-h-rt. — "When she had passed, it seemed like 
the ceasing of exquisite music." 

L. S-mps-n. — "A maiden modest, yet self-possessed." 

S. H-rv-y. — " Lo, the poor Indian ! " 

G. Pf . — " And gentle dullness ever loves a joke." 

N. C N-. — " There's little of the melancholy element in 

her." 

A. N-rth-m. — " She was made for happy thoughts, for 
singing, and sweet laughter." 

M. M-RR-LL. — OOOOOOO 

(102) 



N. Ch-p-n. — " There is not such another." 

K. W-ts-n. — "• Music hath charms to soothe the savage 

breast." 

A. D-v-s. — kt Silence is golden." 

I. C— lb-rn. — " On their own merits modest men are 

dumb." 

J. And-rs-n. — " Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a 

straw." 

J R-p-r. — " How doth the little busy bee improve each 

shining hour." 

A. C-L— . — '• And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant 

mind." 

S. B-rr-ll. — " Divinely tall and most divinely fair." 

N. P b-dy. — "I am not a chicken." 

M. W-th-r-b — . — "A highly respectable young woman." 
E. P rc-. — "And singing still doth soar, and soaring 

ever singeth." 

M. Engl-h-rt. — "A progeny of learning." 

M. R-c-. — u Style is the dress of thought." 

D. H-nm-r. — " None but herself can be her parallel." 

L. S-rg — nt. — "I am monarch of all I survey. My right 

there is none to dispute." 

S. R-ch— rds. — " Caprice must be my only reason." 
H. Thr-sh-r. — "And then came one of sweet and ear- 
nest looks." 

M. Sl-v-ns. — " With her clear and warbling voice, like 

a skylark singing." 

N. B-rr. — " Calm contemplation and poetic ease." 
M. Sh-ll-b-rg-r. — " What's in a name?" 
L. D-v-S. — " Tis folly to be wise." 

( io 3) 



M. Sh-rw — d. — "Love seldom haunts the breast where 

learning lies." 

L. Am-s. — " Graceful and sylph-like." 

N. Sm-th. — " The flowers she touched on dipt and rose, 

and turned to look at her." 

N. Br-wn. — u Nut-brown maiden, thou hast a slender 

waist to clasp." 

V. St-w— . — " Her face, oh, call it fair, not pale." 

M. L-ttl-f — ld. — " Thou disputest like an infant." 

S. Ostr-nd-r. — " As merry as the day is long." 

J. B-lx. — " Why don't the men propose, mamma, why 

don't the men propose?" 

J. Arn-ld. — " Light she was and like a fairy." 

M. Sn— d-r. — " She singeth like a nightingale." 

A. St-l-y. — " She seemed a part of joyous spring." 

J. T-ch-nt-r. — " The proper study of mankind is man." 

M. C-lb-rn. — " All studies here I solemnly defy." 

W. St-w-. — " To mischief bent." 

M. Wh-tn-y. ' 

N. W — db-ry. >." Twin-born, they could not live apart." 

L. Wh-tn-y. . 

M. T-wl-. — " Red as a rose is she." 

J. H-bb-rd. — " She was a phantom of delight." 

A. C-mm-ns. — " The very pink of perfection." 

L. S L-. — "And certain stars shot madlv from their 

spheres to hear the sea-maid's music." 

G. Sh-ll-b-rg-r. — " With die smile that was childlike 

and bland." 

L. W-stc-tt. — "She danced along with vague, regard- 
less eyes." 

(104) 



C. Cl— rks-n. — " So buxom, blithe, and debonnaire." 
II. M-dsk-k. — " And she is exceeding wise." 

M. H-BB-RD. 



LL Two souls with but a single thought." 

C. Wh-t-. 

M. II D. — t4 Sighed, and looked unutterable things." 

M. C-ri.l. — " Frailty, thy name is woman." 

D. M-ll-k-n. — " Eyes more bright than stars that twinkle 
on a winter's night." 

P. C-ll-ns. — "I thought not of my Sabbath dress, I 
thought not of my learning." 

N. R-ch-rds. — " With speeches rare she woos the gentle 
air." 

N. Atk-ns-n. — " She shall possess all gifts." 

E. Edg-rt-n. — " Hast thy toil o'er books consumed the 
midnight oil ? " 

M. L-rd. — " With transport my tongue gives aloose to its 
rage." 

B. L-thr-p. — " Matches are made in heaven." 
G. VV — db-ry. — " In law, an infant." 

E. R-w-. — k ' In single sorrow doomed to fade." 
M. B-ldw-n. — "Is she a native? " 

M. F-sh— r. — u Oh, when shall my soul wing her flight 
from this cla} T ? " 

F. L-MM-. — " Uncertain, coy, and hard to please." 



(105) 



^jnbex 



— OOK«< 



Page 

A Catechism 95 

Around the World 106 

Arrow-heads 101 

Atalanta Club 64 

A Trip to Boston 75 

Auburndale 21 

Battalion 66 

Books that have Helped Me . . 92 

Building (old) 10 

Building (new) 11 

Christian Associations . . . . 55 

Class Day 70 

Class Song 71 

Clippings from the Leaves . . 78 

Conundrums 80 

Cooking 61 

Dedication 13 

Dress-cutting 60 

Editors ; . . 15 

Faculty List 19 

February 22d 93 

From Hawaii 100 

Gathering Dew-drops .... 88 

Guitar Club 59 

Home Letters Contrasted ... 97 

In the Soup 14 

Juniata Club 65 

" Lasell Leaves " . . ... . . 69 



Page 

Lasellia Club . . . . . . . 53 

Make Hay while the Sun Shines . 90 

Melange 82 

Menu ......... 74 

Monday Musings 86 

Ninety 43 

Ninety-One 37 

Ninety-Two 31 

Ninety-Three 25 

Office (cut) 56 

Orphean Club 58 

Our Oldest Member .... 85 

Our Seniors 99 

Preface 16 

Prizes 62 

Quartettes 57 

Scarcity 73 

S. D. Society 51 

Specials 49 

Statistics of '90 81 

Swimming 63 

Swimming-Tank . . . . • . . 68 

The Faculty 83 

The Lasell Girl 96 

To the Sweet-Pea 77 

Trustees 18 

Wanted 89 




O07) 




Ipdex to ^dv^rtis^/T^Qt5. 



Page 

Boston Photogravure Co. 112 

Chickering & Sons 109 

Clapp, Otis, & Son 113 

Cobb, Aldrich, & Co. .• 4 

Ditson, Oliver, & Co no 

Dreka in 

Eastman & Chase 114 

Educational Supply Co no 

Egbert, Marion D 5 

Estey Organ Co. . 109 

Everett (Back Cover) 

Grace, Mrs. J. J 113 

Hammond, Knowlton, & Co 6 

Holland 5 

Knabe, Win., & Co (Front Cover) 

Lloyd, Andrew J 113 

Neat, Nathan, & Co 113 

Pray, J. H., Sons & Co 7 

Ritz 114 

Rothschild, T 1 1 1 

Skinner, Alvah, & Son 114 

Springer Bros 5 

Steinert 3 

Wells, Dr. A. L., Jr. . . • 114 

Wethern, Geo. M " 5 

Whitney, T. D 8 




(10S) 



Estey Pianos and Organs. 




Fully Warranted. Send for Circular. 

159 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. 





Chickering. 

The Largest and Oldest Pianoforte Manufactory in the United States. 

ESTABLISHED 1823. 

Over 78,000 Instruments now in use. 

New Scales, New Improved Actions, New Designs, 



IN 



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Chickering & Sons, 



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BOSTON. 



130 FIFTH AVENUE, 

NEW YORK. 



(109) 



7 NEW MUSIC B OOKS. 7 

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for Piano, by Godard, Bohm, Hofmann, Brahms, and other first- class composers. 

YOUNG PLAYERS' POPULAR COLLECTION ($100.) 51 of the 

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Teachers as the first book of pieces (or recreations) to use. 



WHITNEYS' ORGAN ALBUM 

by 20 good composers. 



.) 33 good pieces for Manual and Pedal, 



OPERATIC PIANO COLLECTION ($1.0 19 of the best operas are repre^ 
sented, and their melodies form the themes for as many pieces, by the best modern composers, 
furnishing the very best entertainment for the lovers of favorite operatic airs. 

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PIANO CLASSICS Vol. I and 2, each, ($1.) Contains pieces of medium difficulty 
and of the best quality. 

POPULAR DANCE MUSIC COLLECTION ($10 is a B bright and 

merry as a book can be, and is quite full of the best new Dance Music. 
Any book mailed promptly for retail price. 

OLIVER DITSON CO., Boston. 



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(no) 



J. ROTHSCHILD, 

32 Temple Place, Boston. 

New York, Paris, 

56 and 58 W. 14th St. 26 Rue d'Engheim. 

IMPORTER AND DESIGNER OF 




rone 



A 




Tine very latest novelties of tr\e seasor] car) 
always be found at our establishments, 



DREKA 



Fine Stationery and Engraving House, 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Commencement, Class Day, Fraternity, Reception and 
Wedding Invitations, Programmes, Banquet Menus, etc. 
Steel Plate Work for Fraternities and College Annuals. 
Fine Stationery with Fraternity or Class Badge, Mono- 
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Visiting Card Plate Engraved for One Dollar. 
100 Cards from the Plate for One Dollar. 

All work is executed in the establishment under our personal supervision, and 
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tation is a guarantee of the quality of the productions of this house. 

Designs, Samples and Prices on application. 



(in) 




Half-Tone and Relief Plates for book and magazine illustration 
BOSTON PHOTOGRAVURE CO., 

27 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON. 



Use SAPODONE for the Teeth. 

SAPODONE is the trade name for a liquid, saponaceous dentifrice which is giving 
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We desire to call your attention to this preparation, and invite, you to give it a trial. 

Directions for Use — First wet the brush, then add a small quantity of Sapodone, 
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Sapodone is put up in two sizes : 2-ounce vial, price 35 cents; 3'V2-ounce vial, price 
50 cents. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY RY 

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Basket Trunks and Steamer Chairs. 

Stateroom and Light- Weight Trunks for European Travel. 

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Established 1870. 

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and 103 Boylston Street, 

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(1.13) 



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TEETH. 

office : 
44 Boylston Street, 

BOSTON. 

DWMODDS^- 

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Up one flight. 6 Winter Street. 




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("4) 



The Everett Piano. 




UnepM in Tone, Touch, Workmanship and Durability. 

WAREROOMS : 

180 Tremont Street, Boston. 



The Everett Piano was the choice of 

Munroe School of Oratory, Society Hall, Wellesley College, 

H.O.Johnson, Charles Parkhurst, 

1st Tenor Ruggles St. Quartette. Editor Zion's Herald. 

We will, on request, mail names of persons in your vicinity who have bought 
Everett Pianos. 

(115)